cjwho:

Pearl Bay Residence, Cape Town, South Africa by Gavin Maddock Design Studio | via

This pristine contemporary home is located on the west coast 90kms north of Cape Town – bordered by a nature reserve adjoining the ocean. Sites like this don’t come much more spectacular. Taking full advantage of the ocean views and responding to the coastal dune context, Gavin Maddock describes it as ‘a glorious site’.

The client wanted a holiday house she would eventually retire to. The brief called for a ‘modern’ house with ocean views and a strict observance of a limited budget, which was to include the standard accommodation requirements.

With the front dune sitting up a little higher than the rest of the site, the challenge was to reconcile house, dune and views. The result is a rectangular double storey structure of 600 square metres with imaginatively conceived outdoor living spaces. It comprises: three bedrooms, four bathrooms, generous living and dining areas both inside and out, a gallery, casual living room, a study, decks, terraces and balconies: Ocean views exist from virtually every room. .

Given a limited brief the focuse was on two main issues: a modern signature within the budget. The architecture and interiors enjoy various aesthetic interests and were inspired by the west coast landscape which is quite textural and typified by simple white houses and cottages, reminiscent of the Mediterranean.

Photography: Adam Letch

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prostheticknowledge:

FOVE

Japanese VR headset is first to claim to have eye-tracking built into the system. Backed by Microsoft Ventures, this could become the VR peripheral for the XBOX brand - video embedded below:

By tracking gaze position in real time it is possible to interact with and control objects on the screen in new ways.

More Here

nemfrog:

Embryonic stages of a bat, a gibbon and a human. Ernst Haeckel. 1905.

nemfrog:

Embryonic stages of a bat, a gibbon and a human. Ernst Haeckel. 1905.

andrewarcher:

wip for goodfuelco ~

More wip on instagram @andrewtarcher

cmog:

Utsuwa vase by Peter Ivy, 2005. Corning Museum of Glass.(via Utsuwa vase [slide]. | Corning Museum of Glass)

cmog:

Utsuwa vase by Peter Ivy, 2005. Corning Museum of Glass.(via Utsuwa vase [slide]. | Corning Museum of Glass)

zerostatereflex:

7 Finger Robot

"The device, worn around one’s wrist, works essentially like two extra fingers adjacent to the pinky and thumb. The robot, which the researchers have dubbed "supernumerary robotic fingers," or "SR fingers," consists of actuators linked together to exert forces as strong as those of human fingers during a grasping motion."

Robot tech, YES.

fiore-rosso:

Etienne Bardelli Akroe.

fiore-rosso:

Etienne Bardelli Akroe.

fuckyeahmoleskines:

finally finished this tedious doodle!
http://amypozga.tumblr.com

fuckyeahmoleskines:

finally finished this tedious doodle!

http://amypozga.tumblr.com

dailydesigner:

Summer House M by M.B.A.

thedsgnblog:

Daniel Siim    |    http://danielsiim.dk

"Digital books are at a rapid growth and currently make up 20 percent of all books sold to the general public in the US alone. As the digital market is expanding, the need for analogue books is becoming more redundant. The redesign of the prodigious novel Star Maker, by William Olaf Stapledon, first published in 1937, serves as an experiment on highlighting the qualities of a book’s physical existence, some of which cannot be accommodated by an e-book. 

This project is a comprehensive study of paper material, text layout and physical size. The book features various paper goods and weights along with a bookcase containing 16 A5-sized artworks representing a visual interpretation of each chapter, and a square-sized constellation map of the books content.” 

Daniel Siim is a Copenhagen-based designer and a BA graduate from The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation. His practice approach a wide scale of graphic design with a focus on printed matter, from small press to major publishing.

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